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Inspirational leaders have charisma. People want to hear what they have to say and do what they advise. But can you learn to be inspiring? Sure. Here are three things you can do to build your charisma:

  • Focus on others. Don’t concentrate on what you need and want. Understand what others care about. The more you relate on a human level the better.
  • Put yourself out there. Seek out and engage others. Be upbeat whenever possible so others feel the same way.
  • Communicate you care. Charismatic leaders are verbally expressive. Tell stories. Use concrete examples. Talk about your feelings. All of these things will invoke common ground in an audience.

Source: Harvard Business Review – Management tips of the day

clinton-forward

Bill Clinton, seen here in Pittsburgh, campaigned frequently for President Obama in 2012.

(Photo: Jeff Swensen, Getty Images)

Three years ago, 24/7 Wall St. published the net worth of every American president, from George Washington to Barack Obama. We have updated our numbers to reflect the earnings of the still-living presidents. One thing remains clear: it pays to be president, especially after leaving office. 24/7 Wall St. examined the finances of all 43 presidents to identify the richest.

In our updated list, the only currently living president who makes the wealthiest list is Bill Clinton, who has an estimated net worth of $55 million. Clinton continues to make millions of dollars in speaking fees. This January, following an email from Bill Clinton to supporters, Hilary Clinton’s 2008 campaign debt was paid off.

President Obama is not one of the wealthiest presidents of all times. Yet his net worth increased from $5 million in 2010 to an estimated $7 million, primarily from his book sales. If Bill Clinton is any indication, Obama can expect to make much more money in speaking engagements once he exits office in 2017.

The net worth of the presidents varies widely. Washington amassed over half a billion in today’s dollars, while other presidents went bankrupt. The fortunes of America’s presidents are often tied to the economy of their time. Over time, as the focus of the economy has changed, so has the way the presidents made their money.

The first few presidents — from Washington’s election to about 75 years later — were large landowners. They generally made money from land, crops and commodity speculation. This left them highly vulnerable to poor crop yields, and they could lose most or all of their properties because of a few bad years. Similarly, they could lose all of their money through land speculation — leveraging the value of one piece of land to buy additional property.

By 1850, the financial history of the presidency entered a new era. Beginning with Millard Fillmore, most presidents were lawyers who spent years in public service. They rarely amassed large fortunes and their incomes often came almost entirely from their salaries. These American presidents were distinctly middle class and often retired without the means to support themselves in anyway close to the presidential lifestyle. James Buchanan, Abraham Lincoln, Lyndon B. Johnson, Ulysses S. Grant, Rutherford B. Hayes and James A. Garfield had modest net worths when they died.

At the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th, there was another significant change to the economy. Large, professionally organized corporations in the oil, mining, financial and railroad sectors allowed individuals to amass large fortunes. The Kennedys were wealthy because of the financial empire built by Joseph Kennedy. Herbert Hoover made millions of dollars as the owner of mining companies. Indeed, since the early 20th century, the fortunes of many presidents, including Theodore Roosevelt , Franklin D. Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy, George and George W. Bush were driven by inherited wealth.

The net worth figures for the 10 wealthiest presidents are in 2010 dollars. For the presidents who made and lost fortunes in a matter of a few years, the net worth of each president is for the peak time. The exception to the 2010 rule are the presidents who are still living, who have more recent earnings. In the case of each president, we have taken into account hard assets, such as land, estimated lifetime savings based on work history, inheritance and homes. Wages considered were earned for services as varied as collector of customs at the Port of New York to royalties on books, as well as ownership of companies and yields from family estates.

This is 24/7 Wall St.’s list of the richest U.S. presidents:

1. George Washington, first president from 1789 to 1797
— Net worth: $525 million In office
His Virginia plantation, Mount Vernon, consisted of five separate farms on 8,000 acres of prime farmland, run by more than 300 slaves. His wife, Martha Washington, inherited significant property from her father. Washington made well more than subsequent presidents: his salary was 2% of the total U.S. budget in 1789.

2. Thomas Jefferson, third president from 1801 to 1809
— Net worth: $212 million
Jefferson was left 3,000 acres and several dozen slaves by his father. Monticello, his home on a 5,000-acre plantation in Virginia, was one of the architectural wonders of its time. He made considerable money in various political positions before becoming president, but was mired in debt towards the end of his life.

3. James Madison, fourth president from 1809 to 1817
— Net worth: $101 million
Madison was the largest landowner in Orange County, Va. His land holding consisted of 5,000 acres and the Montpelier estate. He made significant wealth as Secretary of State and president. Madison lost money at the end of his life due to the steady financial collapse of his plantation.

4. Andrew Jackson, seventh president from 1829 to 1837
— Net worth: $119 million
While he was considered to be in touch with the average middle-class American, Jackson quietly became one of the wealthiest presidents of the 1800s. “Old Hickory” married into wealth and made money in the military. His homestead, The Hermitage, included 1,050 acres of prime real estate. Over the course of his life, he owned as many as 300 slaves. Jackson entered considerable debt later in life.

5. Theodore Roosevelt, 26th president from 1901 to 1909
— Net worth: $125 million
Born to a prominent and wealthy family, Roosevelt received a sizable trust fund. He lost most of his money on a ranching venture in the Dakotas and had to work as an author to pay bills. Roosevelt spent most of his adult years in public service. His 235- acre estate, Sagamore Hill, now sits on some of the most valuable real estate on Long Island.

6. Herbert Clark Hoover, 31st president from 1929 to 1933
— Net worth: $75 million
An orphan, Hoover was raised by his uncle, a doctor. He made a fortune as a mining company executive. He had a very large salary for 17 years and had extensive holdings in mining companies. Hoover donated his presidential salary to charity. He also owned “Hoover House” in Monterrey, Calif.

7. Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 32nd president from 1933 to 1945
— Net worth: $60 million
Roosevelt’s wealth came through inheritance and marriage. He owned the 800-acre Springwood estate, as well as properties in Georgia, Maine and New York. In 1919, his mother had to bail him out of financial difficulty. He spent most of his adult life in public service. Before he was president, Roosevelt was appointed assistant secretary of the Navy by President Wilson.

8. John Fitzgerald Kennedy, 35th president from 1961 to 1963
— Net worth: $1 billion (never inherited his father’s fortune)
Born into great wealth, Kennedy’s wife was an oil heiress. His father was one of the wealthiest men in America and was the first chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission. Almost all of JFK’s income and property came from a trust shared with other family members.

9. Lyndon Baines Johnson, 36th president from 1963 to 1969
— Net worth: $98 million
Johnson’s father lost all the family’s money when LBJ was a boy. Over time, the 36th president accumulated 1,500 acres in Blanco County, Texas, which included his home, called the “Texas White House.” He and his wife owned a radio and television station in Austin, Texas, and had a variety of other moderate holdings, including livestock and private aircraft.

10. William Jefferson Clinton, 42nd president from 1993 to 2001
— Net worth: $55 million
Unlike many presidents, Bill Clinton did not come from a wealthy family, nor did he have lucrative employment before his presidency. But since leaving office we estimate that Clinton has earned more than $125 million before taxes, with the vast majority of that coming from speaking fees. Clinton’s net worth was reduced in 2008 when his wife, Hillary Clinton, wrote off more than $13 million she loaned her campaign for her own presidential bid. Her campaign debt, once over $25 million, was just retired in January.

24/7 Wall St. is a financial news and analysis web site.

Source: http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2013/02/16/richest-usa-presidents/1923739/

លោក-អ្នកតែងលឺពាក្យ​អម ឬពាក្យ​កំដរមួយចំនួន ដ៊ែលប​ង្កើតឡើងដើម្បី​ឲ្យ​មាន​សូរ​កាន់តែ​ពីរោះ ដូចជា កៀកកើយ ផ្លែផ្កា ខ្ចៅខ្យង ភ្ជុំភ្ជរ ជាដើម។ ពាក្យទាំងអស់នេះគេឲ្យឈ្មោះថា ពាក្យបរិវាសព្ទ ឬ ពាក្យគន្លាស់កាត់។

ឧទាហរណ៍៖
សម្លសម្លុក ៖ សម្លុក < សម្លុក + បង់ប្រហ = សម្លបង់ប្រហុក
សមសួន ៖ សួន < សួន + នឹងខ្លម = សមនឹងខ្លួន
ចានក្បាន ៖ ក្បាន < ក្បាន + ជើងក្រែ = ក្បែរជើងក្រាន
ភ្លេងភ្លាត់ ៖ ភ្លាត់ < ភ្លាត់ + នឹងមុំ < ផ្លុំនឹងមាត់
វត្តវ៉ា ៖ វ៉ា < វ៉ា + លោកទាត់ = វត្តលោកតា
។ល។

បើមានការខុសឆ្គងត្រង់ចំណុចណា សូមលោក-អ្នក មេត្តាជួយកែតម្រូវបន្ថែមផង!

The most successful people in business approach their work differently than most. See how they think–and why it works.

man holding a picture of a blooming tree

I’m fortunate enough to know a number of remarkably successful people. Regardless of industry or profession, they all share the same perspectives and beliefs.

And they act on those beliefs:

1. Time doesn’t fill me. I fill time.

Deadlines and time frames establish parameters, but typically not in a good way. The average person who is given two weeks to complete a task will instinctively adjust his effort so it actually takes two weeks.

Forget deadlines, at least as a way to manage your activity. Tasks should only take as long as they need to take. Do everything as quickly and effectively as you can. Then use your “free” time to get other things done just as quickly and effectively.

Average people allow time to impose its will on them; remarkable people impose their will on their time.

2. The people around me are the people I chose.

Some of your employees drive you nuts. Some of your customers are obnoxious. Some of your friends are selfish, all-about-me jerks.

You chose them. If the people around you make you unhappy it’s not their fault. It’s your fault. They’re in your professional or personal life because you drew them to you–and you let them remain.

Think about the type of people you want to work with. Think about the types of customers you would enjoy serving. Think about the friends you want to have.

Then change what you do so you can start attracting those people. Hardworking people want to work with hardworking people. Kind people like to associate with kind people. Remarkable employees want to work for remarkable bosses.

Successful people are naturally drawn to successful people.

3. I have never paid my dues.

Dues aren’t paid, past tense. Dues get paid, each and every day. The only real measure of your value is the tangible contribution you make on a daily basis.

No matter what you’ve done or accomplished in the past, you’re never too good to roll up your sleeves, get dirty, and do the grunt work.  No job is ever too menial, no task ever too unskilled or boring.

Remarkably successful people never feel entitled–except to the fruits of their labor.

4. Experience is irrelevant. Accomplishments are everything.

You have “10 years in the Web design business.” Whoopee. I don’t care how long you’ve been doing what you do. Years of service indicate nothing; you could be the worst 10-year programmer in the world.

I care about what you’ve done: how many sites you’ve created, how many back-end systems you’ve installed, how many customer-specific applications you’ve developed (and what kind)… all that matters is what you’ve done.

Successful people don’t need to describe themselves using hyperbolic adjectives like passionate, innovative, driven, etc. They can just describe, hopefully in a humble way, what they’ve done.

5. Failure is something I accomplish; it doesn’t just happen to me.

Ask people why they have been successful. Their answers will be filled with personal pronouns: I, me, and the sometimes too occasional we.

Ask them why they failed. Most will revert to childhood and instinctively distance themselves, like the kid who says, “My toy got broken…” instead of, “I broke my toy.”

They’ll say the economy tanked. They’ll say the market wasn’t ready. They’ll say their suppliers couldn’t keep up.

They’ll say it was someone or something else.

And by distancing themselves, they don’t learn from their failures.

Occasionally something completely outside your control will cause you to fail. Most of the time, though, it’s you. And that’s okay. Every successful person has failed. Numerous times. Most of them have failed a lot more often than you. That’s why they’re successful now.

Embrace every failure: Own it, learn from it, and take full responsibility for making sure that next time, things will turn out differently.

6. Volunteers always win.

Whenever you raise your hand you wind up being asked to do more.

That’s great. Doing more is an opportunity: to learn, to impress, to gain skills, to build new relationships–to do something more than you would otherwise been able to do.

Success is based on action. The more you volunteer, the more you get to act. Successful people step forward to create opportunities.

Remarkably successful people sprint forward.

7. As long as I’m paid well, it’s all good.

Specialization is good. Focus is good. Finding a niche is good.

Generating revenue is great.

Anything a customer will pay you a reasonable price to do–as long as it isn’t unethical, immoral, or illegal–is something you should do. Your customers want you to deliver outside your normal territory? If they’ll pay you for it, fine. They want you to add services you don’t normally include? If they’ll pay you for it, fine. The customer wants you to perform some relatively manual labor and you’re a high-tech shop? Shut up, roll ’em up, do the work, and get paid.

Only do what you want to do and you might build an okay business. Be willing to do what customers want you to do and you can build a successful business.

Be willing to do even more and you can build a remarkable business.

And speaking of customers…

8. People who pay me always have the right to tell me what to do.

Get over your cocky, pretentious, I-must-be-free-to-express-my-individuality self. Be that way on your own time.

The people who pay you, whether customers or employers, earn the right to dictate what you do and how you do it–sometimes down to the last detail.

Instead of complaining, work to align what you like to do with what the people who pay you want you to do.

Then you turn issues like control and micro-management into non-issues.

9. The extra mile is a vast, unpopulated wasteland.

Everyone says they go the extra mile. Almost no one actually does. Most people who go there think, “Wait… no one else is here… why am I doing this?” and leave, never to return.

That’s why the extra mile is such a lonely place.

That’s also why the extra mile is a place filled with opportunities.

Be early. Stay late. Make the extra phone call. Send the extra email. Do the extra research. Help a customer unload or unpack a shipment. Don’t wait to be asked; offer. Don’t just tell employees what to do–show them what to do and work beside them.

Every time you do something, think of one extra thing you can do–especially if other people aren’t doing that one thing. Sure, it’s hard.

But that’s what will make you different.

And over time, that’s what will make you incredibly successful

Source: http://www.inc.com/jeff-haden/9-beliefs-of-remarkably-successful-people.html

People who fail to achieve goals signal their intent to fail by using this common phrase. Make sure you aren’t falling into the same trap.

busy entrepreneur

People who fail to achieve goals almost always signal their intent to fail by using three little word:

“I will try…”

There are no three words in the English language that are more deceptive, both to the person who says them and the person who hears them.

People who say “I will try” have given themselves permission to fail.  No matter what happens, they can always claim that they “tried.”

People who hear “I will try” and don’t realize what it really means are fooling themselves, by thinking there’s a chance that the speaker will actually succeed.

People who really and truly achieve goals never say “I will try.”

Instead, they always say “I will do” something–or, better yet, “I must do” whatever the task is.As a wise (though fictional) guru once said: “Do, or do not. There is no ‘try.'”

Source: http://www.inc.com